“Our added winter moisture and active calling period led to a very long nesting and hatching season, starting in late April and extending into early summer, with chicks hatching as late as early July,” O’Dell said. “From a population standpoint, we are out of a deficit for the first time since 2001-2002. Quail are starting to pop up in places they haven’t been seen in a while. 

“If you’ve never had the chance to experience what Arizona quail hunting built its name on, then this would be the year to get out and enjoy it.”      

Meanwhile, hunters should note that the season for Mearns’ quail doesn’t begin until Dec. 4. It’s summer rainfall that plays a key role in nesting success and population numbers of this species. After a spotty and relatively weak monsoon across southern Arizona, these birds are likely to be abundant only in pockets that received sufficient precipitation this summer.       

A valid Arizona hunting or combination hunt and fish license is required for all hunters 10 and older. Those hunters under 10 must either have a valid hunting or combination hunt and fish license, or be accompanied by an adult who possesses a valid hunting or combination hunt and fish license. Licenses can be purchased online or at license dealers statewide. A youth combination hunt and fish license (ages 10 to 17) is $5.

The general bag limit is 15 quail per day in the aggregate, of which no more than eight may be Mearns’ quail (when the Mearns’ season opens Dec. 4). The general possession limit is 45 quail in the aggregate after opening day, of which no more than 15 Gambel’s, scaled or California quail in the aggregate may be taken in any one day. After the opening of the Mearns’ season, the 45-quail possession limit may include 24 Mearns’ quail, of which no more than eight may be taken in any one day.

More quail-hunting information can be found on the department’s website at https://www.azgfd.com/Hunting/. Another resource for both new and experienced hunters alike is “An Introduction to Hunting Arizona’s Small Game.” Written by Randall D. Babb, the 196-page, full-color book covers where and how to hunt small game birds (like quail), squirrels, rabbits, ducks and geese. It also includes how to prepare and cook your harvest, with illustrations and recipes. The book can be ordered for $16.95 at www.azgfd.gov/publications.

Finally, hunters should check out O’Dell’s techniques for field-dressing quail at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3gRwZAcWzzk.   

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Publishers Notes: OUT OF STATE HUNTERS, FISHERMEN & OUTDOOR ENTHUSIASTS; Due to the Covid 19 pandemic, there could be limitations for OUT of STATE hunters, fishermen and other outdoor enthusiasts to include a 14-day quarantine requirement or negative COVID-19 testing alternative. Please check with the State's Department of Natural Resources BEFORE you travel or apply for the 2020 Fall Hunts.

Disclaimer:  The views expressed on this site are that of the authors and not necessarily that of TBC Press
North America Sportshows
Apply for AGFC 2022 Urban Archery Deer Hunt by July 11 


Submitted by:  TBC Press
Posted on: 06/06/22
The Backcountry Press
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News # 14788
All hunters must pass a shooting proficiency test, pass the International Bowhunters Education Program (IBEP) course, and attend an orientation before receiving their urban hunt tags. The proficiency test and IBEP course help coordinators maintain a safe hunting experience, while the mandatory orientations will give participants a rundown of rules and tips to help make their hunt successful and avoid any possible conflicts with landowners who live near their hunting area. While hunters may only hunt on private properties where they have gained permission, there are common areas that are open to hunting as well.

In addition to reducing deer populations and offering hunters increased hunting opportunities, urban hunts also provide food for needy families in Arkansas. As a stipulation of the hunt, all hunters must donate their first adult deer harvested to Arkansas Hunters Feeding the Hungry.

Participating hunters must possess a valid Arkansas Sportsman’s Hunting License. Deer harvested during urban hunts do not count toward a hunter’s seasonal limit. There are no limits to the number of deer that can be harvested in urban hunts and all antler restrictions are lifted. All deer harvested must still be checked to the appropriate urban deer zone.

The ABA manages all of the hunts except the Bull Shoals and Lakeview hunts. They charge a $50 orientation fee to offset the cost of equipment and cover insurance for the hunts with the participating cities. Hunters may register online at http://www.arkansasbowhunters.org/urbanhunt

Registration closes July 11 at 11:59 p.m. Participants who do not register in advance may still sign up at an orientation, but will be charged an additional $5. Maps and specific requirements for each city, as well as a list of orientation days, is available at www.arkansasbowhunters.org/urbanhunt.

Hunters interested in the Lakeview and Bull Shoals hunts should contact the president of the Bull Shoals and Lakeview Urban BowhuntersJoey Gentry at [email protected] These hunts also require a $50 club membership to offset the insurance the club pays to administer the hunt. Their mandatory orientation is held the first Saturday in August. Visit their Facebook page for more information. 

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The application period for Arkansas’s special urban bowhunts for the 2022-23 deer hunting season is now open.

The hunts, which begin Sept. 1, offer Arkansas bowhunters an early opportunity to get into the woods. It’s also the most effective method available for wildlife managers to assist cities in maintaining white-tailed deer populations at levels which reduce conflicts with homeowners and drivers.

The following areas will have urban hunts for the 2022-23 season:

  • Bull Shoals
  • Cherokee Village
  • Fairfield Bay
  • Heber Springs
  • Helena/West Helena
  • Horseshoe Bend
  • Hot Springs Village
  • Lakeview
  • Russellville

The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission coordinates with the Arkansas Bowhunters Association and the Bull Shoals and Lakeview Urban Bowhunters group to administer urban bowhunting opportunities in The Natural State. The partnerships help ensure participating hunters are proficient and guides hunters on how to be discreet and understand the nuances of hunting in an urban setting.